Poster Abstracts

Abstract

Abstract

Developing literature continues to report large proportions of COVID-19 patients who present with acute brain dysfunction such as encephalopathy. Recent reports highlight the role of mechanical ventilation and related infusion of sedating medications in brain dysfunction. Medication administration records were reviewed for a cohort of 101 adults presenting for acute inpatient rehabilitation after diagnosis with COVID-19. Archival review identified those with or without related encephalopathy (N=43, N=58, respectively). Chi-square analyses found significant relationships between the presence of encephalopathy and mechanical ventilation. Further analysis revealed that encephalopathy was observed more frequently in those who had received infusions of benzodiazepines (e.g., midazolam) than those whose infusions were limited to non-benzodiazepines (propofol or dexmedetomidine). Similarly, encephalopathy was more common in those with a history of infusions of opiates (e.g., fentanyl) than a history of infusion with other sedating agents. This study offers a preliminary exploration of the relationship between acute brain dysfunction, mechanical ventilation, and related sedative infusion. Further research is needed to analyze adverse effects of sedation and other medical complications on recovery trajectories and outcome.

First AuthorLindsey Richelle Holbrook
Second AuthorCari Cohen
Third AuthorSue Brady
Fourth AuthorNadia Tancredi
Fifth AuthorEric Larson